Useful, Beautiful, Toxic

Jesse Oak Taylor’s recent article in Novel makes a bold claim about modelling, realism, and the project of representation. He suggests that Dickens’ novel “performs a kind of fictional ‘greenhouse effect’ in which the real is severed from its stabilizing lifeline to the natural, giving way to the paradoxically artificial nature of the Anthropocene” (1). Among the things I learned from reading it was the range of Victorian attitudes to urban pollution, including the belief “that coal smoke could be beneficial in combating [the] noxious vapours…killing off the organic components of miasma, sterilizing the fog” emanating from the natural marshes upon which London sat (13). I’m skeptical that very many Victorians held this view—every era has its fringe theorists—but Taylor’s article supports the view that Victorians were deeply aware of and interested in the effects of their industrial lives upon the landscape. Continue reading “Useful, Beautiful, Toxic”

Nineteenth-Century Disability: A Digital Reader

Screenshot of 19thC Disability:  A Digital Reader
Screenshot of 19thC Disability: A Digital Reader

Following up on Connie’s post on “Editorial Traces:  The Yellow Nineties Online“, I’d like to take this post to introduce another digital project, Nineteenth-Century Disability:  A Digital Reader.  The project is an interdisciplinary, open-access scholarly resource on physical and cognitive disability in the long nineteenth-century.  Leading and emerging scholars in nineteenth-century disability studies (including the Floating Academy’s own Jennifer Esmail and Daniel Martin), have chosen texts and objects important to the field, and annotated them with introductions, footnotes, and suggestions for further reading.

Continue reading “Nineteenth-Century Disability: A Digital Reader”

Summer rambles.

ThomasAllenEddy’s thoughtful post about Jeremy Deller’s kaiju-Morris mural in this year’s Biennale is full of interesting observations about what happens when nineteenth-century ideas about art and commerce and social engagement are juxtaposed with twenty-first-century versions of the same. Amid all those big ideas, I found myself quite taken by the small affective moment that kicks off Eddy’s discussion, the “Hey!” that resulted from Eddy’s unanticipated encounter with William Morris in a Globe and Mail image. Continue reading “Summer rambles.”